All the easy stuff is done so now it’s time to go to work. Put release agent on all surfaces of your mold. Put a pipe across the mold and hang the cage in it leaving clearance top and bottom and on sides and ends. (See my previous post on reinforcing for your concrete bench mold.)

I use Quickcrete and if your dimensions are the same as mine it will take one 80# bag and one 60# bag. I add a little Portland cement to make it stronger and easier to finish. Best to use a mixer if one is available.

Mix concrete until it is workable. The less water you use the stronger your concrete will be.

Using a Concrete Mixer

Using a Concrete Mixer

Concrete Ready to Fill Bench Mold

Concrete Ready to Fill Bench Mold

Fill mold till the cage is covered and vibrate by bouncing the mold on the floor.

Filling Mold with Concrete

Filling Mold with Concrete

Vibrating Mold to Settle Concrete

Vibrating Mold to Settle Concrete

Fill the mold to the top and vibrate some more.

Filling Mold to the Top

Filling Mold to the Top

Vibrating Filled Bench Mold

Vibrating Filled Bench Mold

Now you can cut your cage hanging devises loose and get rid of the pipes.

Removing Cage Ties from Bench Mold

Removing Cage Ties from Bench Mold

Finish your work with a magnesium trowel.

Finishing Concrete with Trowel

Finishing Concrete with Trowel

Put in place the threaded inserts. They should be centered 9″ from the end of the bench top.

Inserting Connectors

Inserting Threaded Inserts

Clamp the hangers to the mold so they will stay in place.

Clamping Inserts

Clamping Insert Hangers

Tap the top of the bolt that holds the insert till the concrete works its way around the insert.

Tapping Inserts

Tapping Inserts

Wait until concrete starts to set and finish it with a hard trowel. If you want to sign your work now is the time.

Let set for 2 to 3 days. Turn your work over on boards or foam blocks. Take the nuts and washers off the mold bottom and lift the mold straight up. If the mold gets on the bolts it will scratch the finish. Take the corner bolts out and the mold edges will fall away.

A view of this finished bench can be seen at the top of this website.

Here’s another finished bench, made with a different custom-made mold:

Imagine - Concrete Garden Bench

Imagine - Concrete Garden Bench

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5 comments untill now

  1. whitebread1 @ 2011-10-24 03:28

    I have developed a great interest in building concrete benches recently and of all the research I’ve done on the topic, your site is by far the most interesting and informative. In addition, your benches are the classiest. Great work, and thanks for sharing this information.

  2. Grampa Pete @ 2011-10-24 10:19

    Thank you for your interest in the benches. If you do a bench we would like to see pictures
    Grampa Pete

  3. Grampa Pete @ 2011-10-24 16:48

    We show another way to vibrate bubbles out of bench top. http://petesgardenbench.com/custom-concrete-garden-bench

  4. Hello Grandpa,
    I am making cement benches for my Boy Scout Eagle Project. How are you attaching the legs. With screws or mortar? I can’t tell by the pictures. My feet do not have holes in them. Will mortar be okay to use?

    Thanks, Emilio

  5. Grampa Pete @ 2011-12-09 12:18

    Hi Amilio:
    Thank you for your interest in our benches. I am some concerned about trying to fasten your benchtop to the legs with mortar. Mortar is usually not very strong stuff and if it comes apart and hurts someone you may be liable. Our bench top is fastened with a 3/8 inch bolt on each leg. There is an insert cast into the bottom of the bench tip to recieve the bolt whitch goes through a hole in the leg. If the legs are stable enough the mortar might be ok.
    Grampa Pete

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